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English

Course Offerings

English Courses 2013-2014 

 

FYW 1050 (formerly ENG 1050 and WRT 1050)
Introduction to College Writing (4 cr.)

Introduction to the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the interaction of writer, audience, language, purpose, and situation. Fosters an understanding of the ways in which writing, thinking, and learning are related. Sections limited to 15 students each. Intensive concentration during the semester on the student’s own writing examined in class and in conference with the instructor. Either FYW1050 or ENG1050 or WRT1050 satisfies the Institutional requirement in first-year writing and fulfills FYW in LS Core . Cannot be taken in addition to ENG1050 or WRT 1050. Does not count toward English major or minor. Three hours a week.

ENG 1060
Horror Fiction (4 cr.)

Horror Fiction is an introductory-level course that examines our culture’s undying fascination with narratives involving the supernatural, the deviant, the violent, and the macabre. The greatest horror stories captivate readers, because they serve as metaphors for examining traditional as well as emerging moral, political, and social issues. Course readings include Frankenstein, Dracula and other great horror classics, in addition to contemporary works of horror and science fiction. Course also includes work with horror films. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 1500
Major British and World Authors (4 cr.)

One-semester course designed to introduce students to British and World literature through selected works of writers both classic and modern, as well as others from continental European and non-European traditions. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core Three hours a week.

ENG 1550
Major American Authors (4 cr.)

One-semester course designed to introduce students to American literature through the study of writers representing a range of cultures and literary traditions. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 2050
Introduction to Literary Studies (4 cr.)

This course introduces students to such traditional literary genres as fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as newer and emerging forms such as the graphic novel, creative non-fiction, digital storytelling, and film. Emphasis is given to teaching students to read closely and to write analytically. The course also familiarizes students with a variety of interpretive strategies. Students leave the course recognizing the value of close reading and self-conscious interpretation. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 2200
Introduction to Poetry (4 cr.)

This course exposes students to a wide variety of poems and types of poems composed by authors writing in English. Course work balances close reading of texts with the pleasures created by listening to poems read aloud.

Opportunities for creative assignments. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 2300
Detective Fiction (4 cr.)

Study of two major subdivisions of detective fiction, the puzzle story and the private eye novel, as well as recent trends and developments such as the forensic detective and the female hardboiled private eye. Practice in writing in 126

the genre. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 2700-ENG 2790
Special Topics in Literature (4 cr.)

Study of selected works in relation to a common theme or topic as represented in various periods and genres. Prerequisite: FYW 1050.

ENG 2740
Politics in Literature (4 cr.)

This course examines six literary works in which a major role is played by politics, Shakespeare’s Richard III, Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Shaw’s Arms and the Man, Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front, Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath, and George Orwell’s Animal Farm. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 2750
Women and Literature (4 cr.)

In this course, we will be reading texts that explore the social, cultural and historical forces that both contribute to and repress women’s self-knowledge, and we will explore how race, class and sexuality shape and construct various identities for women. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.

Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 2770
Literature and Film (4 cr.)

Study of the transformation of works of literature into film, focusing on the different techniques used in cinema, literature, and the relationship of film to traditional literature. Class will focus on four major films and the literature they are based on. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG2780
From Comics to Film (4 cr.)

This course will study the impact of graphic novels on contemporary cinema. It will also study the unique art form of comics. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3100
Beowulf and Old English Literature (4 cr.)

Study of Beowulf and other poetic and prose works of the period 700-1100 in translation as well as in Old English. Attention to these works in their historical and cultural contexts and to the development of the English language. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3140
Chaucer and Middle English Literature (4 cr.)

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and other poetic and prose works of the period 1100-1485 in Middle English and in translation. Attention to these works in their historical and cultural contexts and to the development of the English language. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3200
Renaissance Literature (4 cr.)

Study of non-dramatic works of the period 1485-1660 in their historical and cultural context. Emphasis on authors such as Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Jonson, Wroth, Lanyer, Donne, Herbert, and Marvell. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3220
Revenge and Romance: Renaissance Drama (4 cr.)

Through close study of selected plays produced in England from 1590-1642 by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Shakespeare, Webster and Ford, this course examines the literary and theatrical dimensions of Renaissance drama, with particular attention to how the plays dramatize contradictory forces in English Renaissance culture and to placing Shakespeare’s plays in the context of drama by his contemporaries. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week 127

ENG 3250
Shakespearean Drama (4 cr.)

This course explores Shakespearean drama through close study of six plays selected from among the tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances, with emphasis on how our understanding of the plays is shaped by literary genre, early modern theatrical conventions, and the cultural contradictions of the English Renaissance. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3280
Milton and the Culture of Revolution (4 cr.)

This course examines Milton’s Paradise Lost and other poetic and prose works of seventeenth century England in their historical context. Addresses the impact of the English Civil War on the literary imagination, with special attention to political and religious controversy. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3300
Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (4 cr.)

This course examines the writers and works of the period 1660-1800 in their historical and cultural context. Addresses the rise and decline of satire and the emergence of Preromanticism, with special attention to the role of genre in shaping literary expression. Emphasis on authors such as Behn, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3320
Jane Austen and the Eighteenth-Century Novel (4 cr.)

This course examines the development of the English novel from its origins in criminal biography and religious tracts to its excursions into social reform. Addresses the radical instability of this newly-emergent, highly-experimental genre, with special attention to the role of satire and sentiment in shaping narrative constructions of the individual. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3350
Sex, Race, and Empire: 1660-1814 (4 cr.)

This course examines the emergence of women and black male writers into the world of public authorship in England during the Restoration and eighteenth-century. Addresses questions of gender, constructions of race, and impact of mercantile expansion on the literary imagination. Includes such writers as Cavendish, Behn, Equiano, Wollstonecraft, and Austen. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3360
The Undead Eighteenth Century: Origins of English Gothic Literature (4 cr.)

This course examines the origins of English gothic verse and fiction, from the Graveyard Poets through Jane Austen. Attention to the formal conventions of the genre, focusing on the ways in which the supernatural mediates the rational and the irrational, sin and salvation, and licit and illicit sexuality, as well as the persistence of the gothic in popular culture today. Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3400
Kings, Queens, Guillotines: Revolution and Romanticism (4 cr.)

This course examines the dramatic effects of the French Revolution and its legacy of violence and bloodshed on British writing composed during the late 1700s and early 1800s. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3420
American Renaissance (4 cr.)

Some of the greatest masterpieces of American literature were written between 1830 and 1880. This course will study the emergence of a unique brand of American literature during this period, and how it helped to shape the emerging identity of the new country. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3440
Doubt, Change, and Compromise: Victorian Literature (4 cr.)

Victorian Literature—time of complacency or time of turmoil? The British Victorian period, 1832 to 1901, is frequently stereotyped as a time of respectability and conventionality, particularly in comparison to the Romantic period 128.

immediately preceding it. Yet the Victorian world was in many ways one of incredible change and turmoil. The course will include poetry, prose, and fiction by writers such as Tennyson, Barrett Browning, Carlyle, and Dickens, examining some of the very different ways in which Victorians dealt with the problems of their world. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3500
Modern British Fiction, Empire, and Englishness (4 cr.)

British modernist fiction is an innovation in literature that took place from the end of the nineteenth century into the early part of the twentieth century and that broke with the dominant conventions of realism and linear narrative. In this course, we will investigate how empire and World War I transformed fiction, and made it into something altogether new and different. We will question how and why modernism incorporates such elements as dream-logic, fragmentation, and stream-of-consciousness narrative techniques. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3520
Modern Irish Literature (4 cr.)

This course is a survey of key texts by Irish writers throughout this century. We will be reading history, criticism, fiction, poetry and drama as we explore the complex history and politics that inform much of Irish writing, with special attention to the issues of colonialism, nationalism and gender. We will explore the revivalist nostalgia for a “pure” Irish past, as well as the modernist angst and ambivalence of those writers who wished to forge a new identity for Ireland in the wake of conflicts, betrayals and change. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3550
Modern American Literature (4 cr.)

Study of American literature produced by American authors beginning at the turn of the century within the social and cultural context of the period. Emphasis on writers such as Gertrude Stein, Mina Loy, William Faulkner, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Abraham Cahan, Sterling Brown, and Langston Hughes. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3620
Contemporary American Literature (4 cr.)

Study of American literature since the 1960s as a reflection of the social and cultural upheavals of the period. Emphasis on writers such as Dubus, Tan, Wilson, Harjo, Banks, Cisneros, DeLillo, Rich, and Mamet. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3680
The Theatrical Impulse: World Drama Then and Now (4 cr.)

This course traces the theatrical impulse in Western culture by studying the development of drama as a major literary form, from the classical drama of ancient Greece and the European medieval and early modern theater to works from the American and contemporary world stages. Attention to genre, theater history, and the cultural work that drama performs at different moments in its history as well as to how plays are shaped by theater spaces and staging conventions. Readings from such playwrights as Aeschylus, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Brecht, Beckett, Churchill, and Vogel. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3682

Mixing & Mashing Monsters: From Beowulf to Tolkien, Crichton, & Back Again (4 cr.)

Study of literary remixing centering on Beowulf and the poem’s linked remixes and mash-ups, ranging from literary works in other genres, such as those by J. R. R. Tolkien and Michael Crichton, to versions and adaptations in other media arts such as film, comics, video and board games. Some attention to remix theory and copyright issues in digital culture, as well as opportunities for students to create their own literary remixes. Before or After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core.

ENG 3685
Comics and the Graphic Novel (4 cr.)

Study of the comic book and graphic novel as a visual storytelling medium. The course will explore how meaning is produced in graphic narratives through a combination of words and pictures. Verbal and visual properties and conventions of the medium will be explored through study of a variety of graphic narratives, including non-fiction “picto-essays.” After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week. 129

ENG 3700-ENG 3790
Topics in English Studies Series (4 cr.)

Focused study of selected works in relation to a common issue, topic, theme, or tradition. May satisfy before or after 1800, depending on particular course. Prerequisite: FYW 1050.

ENG3700
Self and Society : The Victorian Novel (4 cr.)

The Victorian period (1832-1901) was a time of adjustment, and thus a period in which the process of negotiation between self and society was particularly complex. This course will examine that process of negotiation by looking at three Victorian novels such as Bleak House, Middlemarch, and Jane Eyre in the context of relevant nonfiction materials outlining specifically Victorian expectations and social roles. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3710
The Journey Home: The Excursion in Transatlantic Romanticism
(4 cr.)

This course focuses on the conviction held by nineteenth-century writers living in England and the United States that the road to a perfect world winds through the human imagination. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3730
Modern American Poetry (4 cr.)

As developments in the realms of science, industry, and philosophy came to overturn many of the most widely held truths of the 19th century, they also required artists to, in Ezra Pound’s words, “make it new.” This course will focus on High Modernism alongside the modernisms of the disenfranchised. Writers may include Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Hughes, Loy, Robinson, Frost, Lowell, and Brown. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3735 Hollywood’s America: Gender, Race and Class in American Cinema (4 cr.)

Movies are undeniably the most popular art form of the 20th and 21st centuries and, as a result, provide important insights into the American experience. This course will study landmark Hollywood films that helped to shape modern American identity. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3750
Gods and Monsters: The Shelley Circle (4 cr.)

This course focuses on the work of P. B. Shelley, Mary Shelley, and Lord Byron, early 19th-century British writers who sought to expose the deformities that resulted from their culture’s efforts to stultify imagination and sexuality. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours per week.

ENG 3770
Caribbean Women Writers (4 cr.)

In this course, we will be exploring how Caribbean women writers write about the double bind of gender and colonization, and the impact their writing has on Caribbean literature and history. Some questions we will be asking throughout the term may include the following: What issues concern Caribbean women writers? How do women writers reveal the eclipsed stories and histories of a large part of the population that is only recently beginning to be represented in Caribbean literature? How do they enrich our understanding of Caribbean literature and culture? After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3780
Poets of New England (4 cr.)

Study of New England poets and their influence upon the evolution of a distinctly American poetry. Particular emphasis upon the significance of New England landscape as subject matter, inspiration, and metaphor. Writers may include Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Anne Bradstreet, E. A. Robinson, Robert Lowell, and Sylvia Plath. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3790
Poe, Hawthorne, and the American Short Story (4 cr.)

Study of the influence of Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne upon the emergence of the modern short story, as well as cultural changes within 19th-century America that contributed to the increased market for this new genre. 130

After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3800-ENG 3890
Cultural Diversity Series (4 cr.)

Study of selected writers and works outside the mainstream of traditional literary study, with attention to the question of canonicity. May satisfy before or after 1800, depending on particular course. Prerequisite: FYW 1050.

ENG 3800
Postcolonial Literatures (4 cr.)

While the term “postcolonial” is used to describe and define literatures from former colonies (in this case, former British colonies), the term is hotly debated. In this course, we will read texts from Africa and India in order to work toward an understanding of what is meant by “postcolonial” literatures, with special attention to issues such as identity, resistance, nation-building and nationalism, gender, exile and migration. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3810
American Literature by Women of Color (4 cr.)

Study of authors such as Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gloria Naylor, Amy Tan, and Rita Dove. Emphasis on how the writings of these women grapple with the double bind of gender and race. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3820
Twentieth-Century Drama and Performance by Women (4 cr.)

This course studies a range of twentieth-century female dramatists, exploring how their plays represent issues that are crucial to women’s lives, including identity, family, marriage, motherhood, beauty/body image, race, sexuality, and social class, along with how they both embrace and challenge traditional dramatic forms and styles. Readings include works by African-American, Latina, European-American, and British writers and dramatic forms such as the realistic ensemble drama, the one-woman show, mixed media presentations, and theater of the absurd. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week

ENG 3830
American Indian Renaissance (4 cr.)

Study of the flourishing of Native American poetry and fiction since 1967 when N. Scott Momaday received the Pulitzer Prize for House Made of Dawn. Writers such as Leslie Silko, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Linda Hogan, Simon Ortiz, and Wendy Rose. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3850
Twentieth-Century Caribbean Writers (4 cr.)

This course is a survey of key texts by Caribbean writers throughout this century. We will be reading literature, criticism and theory as we explore the social and historical contexts that inspire Caribbean writers, with special attention to the history of colonialism and the African and Amerindian influences that shape Caribbean literature. We will also examine ritual and spiritual philosophies, such as obeah, and storytelling traditions, such as anancy tales, all of which contribute in various ways to the rich textures of Caribbean writing. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3860
Beyond The Godfather: Italian American Women Writers (4 cr.)

Moving beyond the cultural stereotypes that associate Italian Americans mainly with food and organized crime, this course examines the intersections of gender, ethnicity, and writing in autobiography, fiction, poetry, and memoir by Italian American women authors, focusing on how these writers have discovered, expressed, and redefined their problematic identities within American and Italian American culture as they grapple with such issues as the immigration experience, Old World/New World conflicts, Italian American stereotypes, family, motherhood, marriage, sexuality, beauty/body image, and work. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL and D in LS Core. Three hours a week. 131

ENG 3870
Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (4 cr.)

This course will approach the study of literary modernism (roughly 1890-1940) by focusing on the works of the Harlem Renaissance. We will examine the diversity of African American identities represented in this literature and consider how the Harlem Renaissance helps to redefine America during this fraught historical moment. Readings to be selected from such authors as Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Zora Neale Hurston. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3900 – ENG 3950
Creative Writing Series (4 cr.)

Practice and criticism in a workshop format for those interested in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or other literary forms. Prerequisite: FYW 1050.

ENG 3900
Creative Writing: Fiction (4 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in working with fiction writing. The first half of the course involves analyzing selected short stories and working with focused creative writing exercises. The second half of the course is set up as a fiction workshop, with students presenting their fiction to small groups and to the class as a whole. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3902
Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (4 cr.)

Introduces the genre of creative nonfiction. Students will study and produce prose forms such as autobiography, literary memoir, imaginative non-fiction (non-fiction purposefully incorporating fiction); literary journalism. The latter half of the course will be devoted to workshop, in which students read and respond to each other’s longer nonfiction projects. Prerequisite: FYW 1050.

ENG 3910
Writing Comics and the Graphic Novel (4 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in writing for comics and graphic novels. It is a workshop course in which students learn the basics of creating a narrative that relies heavily on complementary images for its effect. The class focuses on how to outline, pace, and format comic scripts. Prerequisite FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 3920
Creative Writing: Poetry (4 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in writing poetry. The course will involve reading poetry as well as working with focused creative writing exercises and the reading and discussion of student’s poetry in workshop format. Prerequisite: FYW 1050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 4000
Advanced Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction (4 cr.)

Discussion and critical evaluation of students’ fiction pieces in workshop format. Designed for students with a previous background in fiction writing and an understanding of the conventions of the genre in which they are working. Prerequisite: FYW 1050, ENG3900, or permission of instructor. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 4100-ENG 4200
Special Topics and Field-Based Seminar Series (4 cr.)

A diversified series that permits study of a work, author, or topic in seminar format. Also provides options for students to fulfill the core curriculum experiential learning requirement. Restricted to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: FYW 1050 and ENG 2050, or permission of instructor. May satisfy before or after 1800 or other English major requirement depending on the particular course.

ENG 4100
Seminar: King Arthur in Victorian England (4 cr.)

Nineteenth-century British authors and artists, like those of other periods, adapted the tales of Camelot and King Arthur’s court to reflect their own culture and time period. The course focuses on an analysis of Victorian texts that reconstruct Arthurian materials to reflect cultural attitudes on such subjects as the concept of honor, the nature of the 132

hero, and the role of women. After 1800. Prerequisite: FYW 1050 and ENG 2050, or permission of instructor. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 4160
Readers, Writers, and Books (4 cr.)

Study of various topics in book history, such as editing, publishing, and printing texts, textual criticism, book format and design, bookselling and collecting. Hands-on sessions in McQuade Library’s Special Collections. Prerequisite: FYW 1050 and ENG2050. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core. Three hours a week.

ENG 4850
Public Service Fall or Spring Internship (8 cr.)

As participant observers, students study theoretical and practical approaches to government by serving as research and staff aides to leaders in the public sector at the federal, state or local levels of government. Students must work at least an average of 20 hours per week in the field. In addition, students will work individually and in groups with the internship Director to produce a 20-25 page research paper on a topic related to the internship experience. Prerequisite: Seniors and juniors with permission from the Instructor and English Dept. Chair. Four (4) of the eight credits earned for this internship may be used to fulfill an English major Elective requirement. Fulfills X in LS Core.

ENG 4851
Public Service Summer Internship (4 cr.)

As participant observers, students study theoretical and practical approaches to government by serving as research and staff aides to leaders in the public sector at the federal, state or local levels of government. Students must work in the field at least an average of 15 hours per week for eight weeks, totaling 120 hours. In addition, students will work individually through email with the internship Director to produce a 10-15 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience. Prerequisite: Seniors and juniors with permission from the Instructor and English Dept. Chair. The four (4) credits earned for this internship may be used to fulfill an English major Elective requirement. Fulfills X in LS Core.

ENG 4900
Directed Study (4 cr.)

Intensive program of reading/writing under the direction of a full time member of the department. Provides qualified seniors and second-semester juniors with an opportunity to work in depth on a focused topic not covered by the usual departmental course offerings. Requires a formal detailed proposal approved by the faculty members and the department chair. Prerequisite: ENG 2050, at least three additional courses in the major, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major, or permission of the instructor, in addition to the approval of the chair and consent of the members of the department under whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.

ENG 4950 (W)
Senior Seminar (4 cr.)

Study of selected texts and contexts in seminar format to foster integration of knowledge concerning literature and language as well as to explore issues relating to the creation and interpretation of texts and the current status of English studies. Required for English majors. Prerequisite: FYW 1050, ENG 2050, and senior status. Satisfies Institutional Writing Intensive requirement. Fulfills W in LS Core. Three hours a week.

JRL 2020
Feature Writing (4 cr.)

Study of theory and practice in the preparation of newspaper and magazine feature writing. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Three hours a week.

JRL 2040
News Writing (4 cr.)

Examination of writing techniques and styles appropriate to news coverage in a community newspaper. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Three hours a week.

JRL 2070
Sports Writing (4 cr.)

Examination of writing techniques and styles appropriate to sports coverage in newspapers, magazines, and other publications, assignments that will require attendance at intercollegiate sporting events on campus. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Three hours a week.