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Office of the Provost

James Kaklamanos, Ph.D.

 

Jim Kaklamanos joined the faculty of the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at Merrimack College in fall 2012.  A native of Nashua, N.H., Jim completed his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., in 2012.  He specializes in the area of geotechnical engineering, which concerns the behavior of earth materials and their effects on the built environment.  Jim’s graduate research focused on the improvement of models for predicting earthquake-induced ground motions.  With a greater understanding of the level of ground motion expected during earthquakes, engineers will be better able to design earthquake-resistant structures, and ultimately reduce the loss of life and property during earthquakes.  As a member of the Merrimack community, Jim will be teaching courses in geotechnical engineering and in civil engineering more broadly, and he hopes to give students the opportunity to become involved in earthquake research. 

Email:   Kaklamanosj@merrimack.edu                                                             Office:   Mendel 123                                                                                         Phone: 978-837-3401    

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Faculty Facts

  • I’m a very big Boston sports fan, especially the Red Sox and Bruins. I’m also excited to get into the Merrimack College Hockey spirit this season!

     

  • My office overlooks Mendel Pond– this view is very rewarding and it’s exciting to see a campus as nice as Merrimack in action.

     

  • “Life moves pretty fast–if you don’t stop and look around every once in a while, you’ll miss it.”  

    Ferris Bueller 

  • One of the nice things about studying earthquakes is that it provides opportunities for traveling. I’ve had the opportunity to work with people across the world to improve our knowledge of earthquakes and to improve our sustainability by reducing the loss of life and property during earthquakes.

     

  • I grew up in Nashua, New Hampshire, and really appreciate New England in the summer. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, running, biking, traveling to new places, and spending time with family and friends.

     

  • With a greater understanding of the level of ground motion expected during earthquakes, engineers will be better able to design earthquake-resistant structures, and ultimately improve our sustainability by reducing the loss of life and property during earthquakes.  Over my career, I hope to be able to offer contributions that will work toward this ultimate goal.

  • In the interest of saving lives and developing sustainable and resilient infrastructure, scientists and engineers are faced with the challenge of developing methods by which seismic hazards can be understood, quantified, and incorporated into seismic design.  

  • I was fortunate to spend five weeks in October and November 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand, where I performed earthquake research at the University of Canterbury. By personally seeing the devastation from the earthquake, I was able to gain an entirely new perspective on earthquakes that numbers and figures cannot truly capture. 

     

  • Disasters such as the 2004 Sumatra earthquake and tsunami and Hurricane Katrina sparked my interest in the design of engineering systems to help reduce the loss of life and property during extreme events.